Slot Machine Names from Around the World

Over the last century slot machines has earned many nicknames all over the world. Some are official terms with a serious ring to them, and some more funny or quirky. Let’s take a quick tour around the globe.

The American term for this well-liked game – and most commonly used online – is slot machine or simply slots, named after the slit where you put the coin. I bet the person who came up with this name never imagined the day when the actual slot will be virtual pixels on a computer screen!

Across the Atlantic Ocean, the Brits call their slots Fruit Machines, after the popular fruit symbols from the classic slots. You don’t have to walk into a casino for some fruit machine action – they can be found in pubs all over the country. If you want to offer one to your visitors and clients in the UK, simply contact your local borough for a license to keep an AWP machine – a acronym for Amusement with Prizes. Very aptly named, isn’t it?

In Australia, slots are officially named Gaming Machines, but the more popular name for a slot is actually a poker machine, and in short (in what sounds like a term of endearment) pokie –a cute name for a pet wouldn’t you say?

Back in Europe, it looks like slots got a pretty bad rep over the years… The Italians call them Macchina Mangiasoldi – the machines that eat money. And it seems Spanish speakers around the world feel the same with their Tragamonedas and Tragaperras, the coin gobbler or swallower. Portuguese speakers also demonstrate a similiar attitude about their slot games, calling it Caça-Níqueis , the nickel hunter.

Both the Swedish and the Danes stick to the one-armed bandit with Enarmade Banditer and Enarmet Tyveknægt, but sometimes use the more neutral Spelautomat/Spilleautomat, which simply mean automatic game. Russian speakers usually keep it correct with ??????? A?????? (pronounced igorny avtomat, in case you’re in Moscow and looking for one) that means gambling machine.

Only in France slots earned a more promising name that perhaps expresses the possibility of winning more than the opposite: it’s called “cash machine” and (like everything) it sounds even more tempting in its original French as Machine à Sous.